Microsoft Outlook

•A good trick to managing your Outlook inbox and keeping it tidy is by creating and organising subfolders for specific emails such as invoices and payments, or if they’re from certain person or company. Doing this makes keeping track and finding emails easier, plus it gives your inbox an overall tidier and less cluttered look. To do this just right click on ‘Inbox’ and select from the drop down menu ‘New Folder’, give it a name and voila! You now have a more organised space for you to put your emails.

Are your finances fit? Get your money moving with these tips

A blue person stands out in a crowd holding a sign with question marks on it

A blue person stands out in a crowd holding a sign with question marks on it

Whether you’re a cyclist or a runner, you’ll know all about the hours of planning and dedication that’s required to be successful.

But did you know that exactly the same qualities can help you achieve your financial goals?

Here are five lessons to get your money moving faster.

1. Set a target
Whether you have a time in mind, or you just want to reach a milestone, you know how important it is to start with a goal. The same goes for saving and investing. When you know the kind of future you’re planning for and what you want to achieve along the way, you’ll be better motivated, better focused and better financially prepared.

So whether you want to retire comfortably, buy a home, or take the holiday of your dreams, start by setting a target you can focus on.

2. Don’t skimp on the training
You can’t just wake up the week before a big ride or run and decide to be part of the race, with no training or preparation. And you can’t just wait until you turn 60 before you start saving for retirement.

If you’re a cyclist or a runner, you know the earlier you start training, the easier it is to build up speed and strength, little by little. Similarly, the earlier you start saving, the more time you have to earn interest on your interest and returns on your returns, so you can finish in style.

3. In for the long haul
Long rides and runs are all about lasting the distance. Try and do too much, too quickly, and it could all end earlier than you planned.

The same goes for investing. A disciplined savings plan that builds your wealth gradually is a very effective way to get you where you want to go, without suffering too much pain along the way. Even a small amount can build up to something surprisingly big over time.

For example, if you put $1,000 in a managed fund at age 30 and then invested just $100 a month, you would have saved more than $40,000 by age 50 (assuming 7.7% growth annually after fees). If you waited until age 40 before getting started, you would end up with only around $16,000.*

4. Mix it up
You probably know that a varied training regime is better than simply running or cycling kilometre after kilometre at the same pace. Just as you should mix up your training sessions with intervals, hills and cross-training, it makes sense to use a variety of different investments to spread risk and to better enable you to reach your lifestyle goals.

So while it may be tempting to focus on paying off your mortgage, don’t forget to pay attention to your super and other investments as well. A mix of investments inside and outside of super could help you achieve your goals both now and in the future.

5. Get a good coach
Every runner and cyclist would perform better with expert advice from someone who knows the race profile, the terrain and devises a personalised training program. And that’s exactly the role a financial adviser plays when it comes to managing your money.

So if you’d like to achieve a financial PB (Personal Best), consider talking to us.

* Based on an investment return of 7.7% pa, inflation of 3% pa. This example is for illustrative purposes only and returns are not guaranteed in any way.

*John Flanagan is an Authorised Representative of RI Advice Group Pty Limited (ABN 23 001 774 125), AFSL 238429. This editorial does not consider your personal circumstances and is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account any of your individual objectives, financial solutions or needs. Before acting on this information you should consider its appropriateness, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs. You should read the relevant Product Disclosure Statements and seek personal advice from a qualified financial adviser. From time to time we may send you informative updates and details of the range of services we can provide. If you no longer want to receive this information please contact our office to opt out. The views expressed in this publication are solely those of the author; they are not reflective or indicative of Licensee’s position, and are not to be attributed to the Licensee. They cannot be reproduced in any form without the express written consent of the author.